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APA NPC17 Session: Designing Streets for Transit-Based Neighborhoods

Join NACTO for an in-depth hands-on charrette workshop and peer-to-peer case presentations by cities that have assembled people-first transit corridor design, bike network rollout, and walkable streets to create transit neighborhoods – growing ridership and making cities more equitable at the same time. Better design can transform streets once dominated by motor vehicles into the spines of transit neighborhoods that provide both easy transit access and places to go without a car once riders step off the bus or train. Great streets for people are at the core of this work, documented in the transformative NACTO Transit Street Design Guide, Urban Street Design Guide, and Urban Bikeway Design Guide.

A growing and diverse group of U.S. cities are successfully pairing improvements like dedicated bus lanes and better stop design with bus branding and all-door payment, integrating bike share stations with transit stops, and integrating both with high-comfort all-ages bikeway networks centered on protected bike lanes. Learn from city practitioners about how their cities have planned, designed and implemented these features, using strategic, systematic and scalable approaches that can build into neighborhood networks and ultimately city-wide and region-wide approaches.

With a majority of US residents expressing a preference to live in walkable, bikeable urban places, cities are struggling to equitably meet the need for urban growth. Active transportation design and transit service planning are fast and powerful tools that planners can wield together – even when zoning tools are limited – to expand the reach of the transit network and the breadth of walkability in a city.